I’m a busy person. Will my health be affected?

The XXIst century is often called the century of speed, of technological evolution and the Information Age. One of the symptoms most often felt in the third millennium is stress and constant pressure due to an ever busy lifestyle. This collective way of thinking was mentioned in The Washington Post, in an article debating the idea that being too busy is no longer just a way of life, but a badge of honor.

Success in personal and professional life is measured in how full your agenda is; the main disadvantages take the form of exhaustion, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and loss of productivity. The sacrifice of quality to the detriment of quantity can be a fatal choice that will directly affect your health and well-being. Here are some of the most common effects of a busy lifestyle.

  1. Unhealthy and chaotic nutrition is adopted by people who are working around the clock. Being too busy involves a high level of stress, a cause for problems such as headaches, stomach pain, high blood pressure, chest pain and insomnia.
  2. Restless or insufficient sleep is an important cause that affects concentration and creativity. A too busy work schedule often demands the sacrifice of sleeping less that is absolutely necessary for everyone’s well-being.
  3. Sport and physical activities are left out in favor of other activities. Often, when a person is too busy discards the activities that help him/her relax even though they are extremely beneficial.

The side-effects of a busy lifestyle accumulate and can negatively impact a person over time, but research shows that this approach can also be beneficial to the brain. A study by the University of Texas has shown that people who are always busy respond better to cognitive tests than those who have a relaxed lifestyle.

The results showed: higher response speed, better memory, reasoning, and more crystallized knowledge.

Although the health may be affected, the overall tendency is to ignore them, always resorting to health insurance which covers the medical tests and consultations necessary to discover a possible disease.

References:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2016.00098/full

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/advice/?utm_term=.75aa4d5497f2

Photo source:

www.freepik.com/free-photo/agency-young-adult-profession-stressed-black_1077974.htm